Server Room Organization - The First Step in Maintaining a Healthy Network

by BlogAdmin 13. July 2011 16:07

There is no denying that wireless technologies throughout the years have provided numerous benefits, not the least of which, are reduced cable clutter hidden behind desks, work stations, and equipment. But while reaping the benefits of an organized work floor, it is also important that one not forget the heart of the operation - the structure of the server room. Sever rooms with little or no regard for cable organization can quickly become a nightmare. A lack of planning can eventually turn an orderly environment into a cabling disaster! The good news is, that this is completely avoidable. By pre-planning the structure of your sever room with help from these easy-to-follow tips it is possible to achieve a secure, well organized server room.

  1. Choose the right server room - when deciding on a location for your server room take into consideration:
    Room Size - will you have adequate space for current needs and potential expandability?
    Location - are you central to all computers on the network and in an area free of traffic and environmental hazards?
    Ventilation - cooling and ventilation is more important in a server room than other rooms because of the extra heat generated by the computer equipment. Additional air-conditioning or ventilation ducts may be required to keep the server room environment comfortable, not only for human operators, but also for temperature sensitive equipment.
  2. Server Room Layout - Be sure your server room has enough space for all equipment and that cables and cable connections are easily accessible. Basic wiring should be stored either overhead or in the space under a raised floor to prevent tangles and provide a safe working area.
  3. Cable Management - Neat and easily identified cables help simplify troubleshooting. Most computer server racks provide some method of cable management, either through use of cable raceways, metal loops, or closed cable channels. Nylon cable ties are also an effective way to gather loose cables and differentiate between different wiring segments in your network.
  4. Security - Controlled access to a server room is critical. To prevent any unwanted activity with your network implement passwords on all systems and consider locked or restricted access to server rooms.

By following these simple guidelines and practicing good housekeeping, your server room can easily become your first defense when establishing the basis of a healthy network.

NEMA AC Input and Output Connector Styles….. Are You Confused?

by Jennifer, Inside Sales Associate 6. July 2011 08:35

If you find yourself confused about what NEMA AC input and output connector styles exist, you’re not alone.  It can truly be confusing to the untrained eye.

Different types of AC input and output connectors are designed to address various wiring systems. Each unique design also aids in the area of safety, as only the appropriate plug will fit into the proper receptacle. For example, the 5-20R outlet is capable of accepting the 5-20P as well as the 5-15P. However, the 5-20P will not connect to a 5-15R. A quick reference guide is provided below to serve as a helpful tool in clearing up some of that confusion.

**Fields highlighted in yellow are 3Ø∆; Fields highlighted in green are 3ØY

“K.I.S.S. – Keep It Safe and Sound” Safety Tips for Surge Protectors and Power Strips

by Jennifer, Inside Sales Associate 30. May 2011 01:55

Surge Protectors and Power Strips each have very distinct functions. Surge protectors are devices designed to protect electrical devices from voltage spikes. A power strip is a strip of electrical sockets that may be attached to the end of a flexible cable and allows multiple devices to be plugged in.

Every year thousands of injuries, fires, and deaths occur from surge protectors and power strips.
Below is a list of suggestions to help keep you safe and prevent a fire.

  1. Surge protectors and power strips are not a substitute for permanent wiring.

  2. Use care when inserting or removing a plug from an outlet. If you make contact with live prongs, it could result in electric shock

  3. Never plug a power strip or surge protector into an existing power strip or surge protector. This is also called “daisy chaining”

  4. Examine your surge protector or power strip on a regular basis to ensure that it is not hot, damaged, or has frayed wires.

  5. Never tape or staple a power strip or surge protector down.

  6. A surge protector or power strip should not be exposed to a moist environment unless it is specified by the manufacturer.

  7. When taking the plug out of the outlet, pull from the plug. Do not pull from the cord.

  8. Make a habit of unplugging it when it is not being used.

  9. Never cover a power strip or surge protector with anything that may prevent air circulation.

  10. If you have any questions regarding the proper operating procedure for a power strip or surge protector, do not hesitate to reach out to someone with experience and knowledge.
    You are always better safe than sorry

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